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Vol-5 Issue-4
1. Nature Talk
Niyam-Raja as the Saviour!
2. Neolithic Money: A Matter Off Market
3. Negotiated ‘Identities’: A Case Study of Tamil Nadu
4. Electoral Participation: An Overview of 2003 and 2008 Assembly Elections to Meghalaya legislative Assembly
5. Electoral Politics in Meghalaya: A Study of Lok Sabha Elections in 2004 and 2009.
6. Administrative Changes In The Lushai Hills Under The British Rule
7. Indebtedness among the Marine Fishery Communities in Odisha
8. People-centric R and R policy is necessary

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Special Article

Electoral Participation: An Overview of 2003 and 2008 Assembly Elections to Meghalaya legislative Assembly
Kailash Chandra Das

 

    

The election system is the pillar of democracy. Election is a contrivance through which a modern state creates amongst its citizens a sense of involvement and participation in public affairs. The study of election in the greatest democracy of the world has been found to be of great importance. Electoral participation as a key segment of political participation also appears to be a vibrant theme in the realm of election studies. Meghalaya, one of the small states in the country has an interesting historical background of elections. Since its inception, barring the first general election to Legislative Assembly, Meghalaya has experienced fractured mandate and fewer activities from voters’ side except on voting day. There is almost nil involvement in other political activities. But this paper aims at showing how there is a significant increase in voters’ turn out in both 2003 and 2008 elections. More interestingly in 2008 election the voters’ turnout was highest ever. An attempt has been made by the researcher to study different factors influencing voting behaviour and performance of different political parties in both the elections. The fractured mandate in almost all elections made the state of Meghalaya to experience over the year coalition politics. It may also be noted that since the demographic condition of the state varies across different ethnic and tribal population, the electoral success by a particular party is difficult to be achieved. The increase in voters’ turnout, notwithstanding, in both the elections the performance of regional parties was less significant as compared to the previous elections. Though regional parties had played ethnic card to protect the tribal identity and gain votes in the election, the national parties performed much better, and increased their seats remarkably in both the elections. Indian National congress, which was termed as a foreign party by the regional parties during the initial year of elections, was able to claim its stand to form governments in both the terms.

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Articles in
Vol-5 Issue-4
1. Nature Talk
Niyam-Raja as the Saviour!
2. Neolithic Money: A Matter Off Market
3. Negotiated ‘Identities’: A Case Study of Tamil Nadu
4. Electoral Participation: An Overview of 2003 and 2008 Assembly Elections to Meghalaya legislative Assembly
5. Electoral Politics in Meghalaya: A Study of Lok Sabha Elections in 2004 and 2009.
6. Administrative Changes In The Lushai Hills Under The British Rule
7. Indebtedness among the Marine Fishery Communities in Odisha
8. People-centric R and R policy is necessary

 

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