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Vol-6 Issue-2
1. Nature Talk
2. Lodhas of West Bengal : A Case Study
3. Saora Kinship Terminology
4. The Social and Cultural Problems of Tribes
5. Statehood Demands after Telengana: Politics of Agitation in the Koshal Region in Odisha
6. Archaeological Excavation at Banga of Harirajpur, District Puri, Coastal Odisha: A preliminary Report

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The Social and Cultural Problems of Tribes
Sunaram Soren

 

    

While speaking about the tribal society and its culture, it is commonly held that their social life is bad and their culture is not of high standard. They need to be raised from the bottom and be brought to be at par with modern society. Such attitude had begun from the whites in the western countries. They used to smuggle the African and Australian residents out of their respective regions and keep them as slaves. But when good sense took over them, these simple and innocent tribes appeared to them as extremely poor and impoverished, and they took pity on them. It raises suspicion as to whether there was any conspiracy of imperialism in demonstration of such pity. The customs of the tribes of Africa and Australia were much different from those of whites. Normally, one loves his/her own traditional customs. Therefore it was not unnatural that the whites considered these tribes as uncivilized and savage. They (whites) believed that closer these tribes were raised to their (whites’) level by educating and civilizing them (tribals), more they would be raised to the state of development. We all know what has happened to the condition of the tribes as a consequence of working with such belief or purpose. The American tribes are losing fast their identity. The tribes of Australia are almost on the verge of extinction. In Africa also decimation of Negroes had started but now that in them patriotism has risen, may be there could be a (visible) growth. In the epics of our country, we learn that in our country too, the Aryans had held tribal people as demons (Asura) and non-Aryans etc. and looked at them with hatred and caused them all kinds of hardship. Today we know the consequence of our native caste population trying to become civilized in the yardstick of whites. The early culture of our land has been forgotten. The natural development has become impossible while the social culture is disappearing. Though our scholars have begun to realize this, yet some reformers are trying to initiate the process of development that would raise the tribes to the state achieved by the Brahmins, Khatriyas and Khandayats (caste hindus) under British. The tribal people, who have become conscious, have begun looking at such process of development and attempts to raise tribal people this way with suspicion. The so-called high caste communities who have been for the last two hundred years following the manners of (western) civilization, and for that regretting their decision, to develop the tribal people in the same manner, I consider, would amount to the unnecessary wastage of time, money and life.

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Articles in
Vol-6 Issue-2
1. Nature Talk
2. Lodhas of West Bengal : A Case Study
3. Saora Kinship Terminology
4. The Social and Cultural Problems of Tribes
5. Statehood Demands after Telengana: Politics of Agitation in the Koshal Region in Odisha
6. Archaeological Excavation at Banga of Harirajpur, District Puri, Coastal Odisha: A preliminary Report

 

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